Something About…

Something About Soy Sauce…

Filed under: Food — Administrator @ 3:39 pm Edit This

…sushi.part 5…

Although California is abundant in fresh fish, you might want to try Sakae Sushi to experience fresh fish airlifted from Tsukiji, the large fish market in
Tokyo. In this season, you can enjoy seared bonito or Japanese shad. The atmosphere is that of a typical Japanese neighborhood sushi place with some interesting table wares, including soy sauce pot shaped like a little persimmon.

Soy sauce is actually a very difficult thing to deal with when it comes to sashimi or sushi. Although I generally think people should eat sushi as they like, soy sauce is something I feel like preaching about when I visit American sushi restaurants.

First, you do not need to put so much soy sauce in that little soy dish that comes with sashimi or sushi. Some people almost top it off, but I would even be careful so that the edge of the soy sauce will not touch the inner rim of the dish. There are two reasons for this.

One is that soy contains high percentage of salt (usually 16 to 19%), and it is not good for your health. So, you should use it little by little. Secondly, it is not esthetically good looking if anything makes a dish too full. When it comes to what is beautiful in Japanese meal, especially something “liquidy”, it is always considered better to have the cup or dish filled much less than full. (Many foreign visitors in
Japan complain that their expensive cup of coffee is only filled to half level.)

Then comes the more advanced part of dealing soy sauce: How sushi touches the soy sauce before it goes into your mouth. This may be surprising, but you should dip the fish side, not the rice, into the soy sauce. Many people in
Japan do not know this, either, but this is critical in good sushi eating. How you do it, however, is a little tricky.

When you pick up a sushi piece using your thumb, first and second fingers, you just turn it over so that the sushi piece is almost upside down. If you are using chopsticks, you might first want to knock down the sushi piece sideways, so that you only need to twist your wrist 90 degrees to dip the sushi upside down into soy sauce..

When you touch the soy sauce with sushi, it has to be quick, almost like a fish jumping up from between the waves. You do not soak sushi in soy sauce. Sushi is after all about freshness and liveliness. So, remember, if your sushi piece resembles yourself in a bathtub on weekends, resting comfortably in liquid very long, you have done it incorrectly.

Many sushi connoisseurs say that it is the fish side, again, that first touches your tongue when eating. This way, you can enjoy the taste and the texture of the fish well with some flavors of soy.
written by Noriko Takiguchi / submitted by
Daniel Kim

Comments (1)

June 20, 2005

I Say Tomato…

Filed under: Food, Shopping — Administrator @ 11:36 am Edit This

The Slow Food Movement and the days of yesteryear leave me wondering where I can get the perfect tomato. Could it be in my small, local market where the producers reflect generations of commitment to the land and devotion to the processes that yield the greatest achievements in taste? No, the baseball-glove skins of those little guys can’t be ignored with any amount of salt sprinkled on, but luckily
Austin has Central Markets and Whole Foods to fill the food-shopping void.

Tasteless, soul-less, and loveless tomatoes live meaningless lives all over, but not in my kitchen. Everyday, a tomato is raised in-kind to meet my personal standards of yumdom. It’s like a

University of
Tomato process that most tomatoes only dream about attending. The xenophobic and rubber-skinned tomatoes of
Central Texas needn’t bully the tasty foreign fellas into extinction. There is a tomato to suit every palette with the perfect tomato experience.

Comments (0)

June 16, 2005

Fondueloo…

Filed under: Wine/Drinks, Food — Administrator @ 6:14 pm Edit This

The night’s early hours seemed to forecast doom. Pretensions were abound and the constant up-sells were helping the Melting Pot lose credibility. I wondered if this location had opened its doors for the first time that morning, but later discovered they were into their first ½ year stretch.

After reservations were delayed for 20 minutes and a move to our 2nd table, we were seated in the bar area (basically onstage with no privacy-“I forgot my ukulele at home”) with 1 burner to serve our food-heating needs (“Nobody brought an extra camping stove, either”). We needed a 2-burner table. Upon reaching our 3rd table in half an hour, we seem to be planted. A sip into the 2001 Norton Malbec, the night finally began to sail.

I had spotted the 2001 Gardine Chateauneuf-du-Pape on the wine list to keep in mind for the evolving arsenal, so the evening could only get better. Our waiter eventually calmed down, found his groove, and let us just ‘be’. Great conversation proceeded to drive our meal. Talks of San Francisco and
Missoula. Talks of life in general. In the fondue-ring, we had the battle of the meats versus the fish. I wasn’t sure how we would all move from the cheese course to the salad to the fondue-ring, as we all seemed to fill-up, but we were all strong. We knew we could do it.

As the early part of the evening drifted from our minds, it became a good night. We were celebrating the birth of a life. We were celebrating proposed matrimony. I always find the focus of food, wine, and conversation to be clear, when left to its own accord, in a simple and warm way.

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Muscat Granita…

Filed under: Wine/Drinks, Food — Administrator @ 10:59 am Edit This

Need a refreshing and elegant summertime dessert? Cooking Light magazine came up with a terrific, easy granita you make with lusciously fruity
Muscat wine and fresh peaches. St. Supery, in California’s
Napa
Valley, makes a good
Muscat that they call by the grape’s Italian name, moscato. It’s about $18 for a 750ml bottle and it’s perfect for this.

Peel and slice enough peaches to fill 4 cups. Place the peaches and one bottle of
Muscat wine in a blender and puree them. Strain the pureed peaches through a sieve, discarding the solids. Combine 1 cup of water with ¾ cup of sugar in a saucepan and bring to a boil, stirring constantly until the sugar dissolves. Remove from the heat and stir in 2 more cups of water. Whisk the wine-and-peach mixture with the sugar mixture and then pour it into a 13-by-9-inch baking dish. Freeze for approximately six hours or until firm. Stirring the mixture twice during the first two hours of freezing will guarantee a smoother consistency. Spoon the granite into old-fashioned
Champagne coupe glasses and serve. –Karen MacNeil

Comments (0)

May 23, 2005

Eat to Eat…

Filed under: Food — Administrator @ 10:17 pm Edit This

Get more conscious with your food. Eat on purpose, not just to eat for eatsake. Dedicate a meal moment as a meditation. Don’t take freedom for granted.

Take advantage of the brilliance of eating. When is the last time you had a 4 hour dinner?

May 23, 2005

Film is good food.

Filed under: Film — Administrator @ 10:21 pm Edit This

French publication Cinergon has new texts on interactive cinema, Abbas Kiarostami, and the anti-philosophy of Jean-Luc Godard. (in French)

Cinergon

May 23, 2005

Music is good food.

Filed under: Music — Administrator @ 10:22 pm Edit This

Music is a significant part of life. It is part of history, traditions, and heritage. It is imperative that we introduce children to this important piece of life. Children need to create music, listen to it, analyze it, experience it, and understand the impact that music has on our world.

Music brings communities together during holidays, during tragic times and in everyday life. It is our duty to teach each other to understand this sense of community and the impact music has on it. Sharing music is a way of communicating ones self. It’s an art form in itself that people can enjoy actively or passively.

May 23, 2005

Theatre Relation.

Filed under: Theatre — Administrator @ 10:23 pm Edit This

Art is that communication made necessary by the failure of conventional forms to express an idea. An artist is an individual who can not express himself adequately in day-to-day methods of interaction, and therefore searches out other means of expression. Anyone can be an artist, and everyone is at some point in their lives.

I believe theatre to be the most beautiful and powerful form of art. It has the power to move people to quiet contemplation or to riot, to raise awareness or to lower stress levels. More than any other art form–because of the nature of the shared experience that theatre creates–it has the ability to bring people together.

Theatre should not compete with film. It is a medium that can encompass nearly every other artistic media, and, most importantly, allows the audience to relate to live human beings sharing time and space with them. It is this shared world in which lies the magic of theatre, which theatre should embrace, celebrate, and give to the audience.

If the theatre artist wants to communicate a message to people, she should be conscious of whom she wants to communicate it to, and address it to them. Theatre is most powerful when its subject matter is one that the audience can relate to. A script about a playwright and an actor will be most relevant to those people, and may go so far as to alienate those not in the field. If we are to keep theatre alive and build audiences, we must be vigilant in keeping our theatre about them, not just about us.

Art for the sake of art is an exercise in masturbation: Temporarily satisfying, and occasionally necessary, but ultimately, inherently, unproductive. -Boris

September 1, 2005

Katrina Volunteers Needed at Tony Burger Center…

Filed under: Gather (events), Community — Administrator @ 11:37 am Edit This

If you are able to help, please do. You can also take a look at: City of Austin Office of Emergency Management

You can help Hurricane Katrina victims and refugees by donating money online or over the phone.
Red Cross: 1-800-435-7669 (1-800-HELP-NOW) http://www.redcross.org

Aid groups say the cost of transportation and logistics associated with food, clothing or other non-monetary donations will hinder Katrina aid efforts.

Other groups are also helping:
Salvation Army: 1-800-725-2769 http://www.salvationarmyusa.org/

United Way

: http://www.unitedway.org/ – The American Red Cross has opened a shelter in Austin for evacuees from Hurricane Katrina who made it to
Austin. They will not be able to return home for at least several days. The shelter is at the
Toney
Burger
Center, a special events-athletic facility operated by the
Austin
Independent
School District located on U. S. Highway 290 West in

Sunset
Valley. Anyone from the hurricane stricken area who needs shelters should call the local American Red Cross at 877-929-1224.

Louisiana refugees are asked to call before returning home:

Louisiana State Police Hotline 1-800-469-4828

Austin Area: The Red Cross needs money, but they also need volunteers.
Wayne Bresenel, Red Cross CenTex Executive Director, stated that they
need help in the Austin office ( Pershing Drive off of Airport Blvd) to
handle phone calls, scheduling, and gathering information. They also
need volunteers to go to the
Tony
Burger
Center (
South Austin) to help
with the people who are being re-located there. Help is needed at all
hours, and will be needed through the weekend. The Red Cross can also
use donations of hotel size shampoo, lotion and soap.

If you can help, call Barbara at 512 929 1225 to volunteer.


Dallas: Many people are being evacuated to Reunion Arena. They are
asking for donations of soaps, shampoos, blankets, cleaning supplies,
etc. Organizations who want to make donations outside of monetary
donations need to call the American Red Cross In-Kind donation area at
214-678-4216 and be prepared to list the donated items along with the
monetary value of each item. The American Red Cross will either ask you
to come to the distribution center to drop the donation off or they may
direct the organization to take the items directly to Reunion Arena. NO
ITEMS SHOULD BE TAKEN DIRECTLY TO
REUNION ARENA WITHOUT A RELEASE FROM
THE IN-KIND DONATION AREA FIRST.

We also understand that people are being re-located to the Astrodome in
Houston, but we don’t have detailed information on that as of yet.

Comments (0)

May 23, 2005

Community is good food.

Filed under: Community — Administrator @ 10:25 pm Edit This

Sign-up to help the unique movement of humanity committed to improving the positive impact on society. You might not be able to solve every problem, but do what YOU CAN do. Find a way to help the vulnerable and less fortunate. If you know how to fish, don’t just toss the hungry a fish… Teach them!
Share your strength.

May 23, 2005

Epiphany about good food…

Filed under: Epiphany — Administrator @ 10:25 pm Edit This

Enlightenment should come easily when one has options.
Opportunity lurks and the taste buds come alive. I love options. It’s important to take advantage of ‘Good Taste’ options so that the ‘Good Taste’ producer is encouraged to continue creating the ‘Good Taste’, pressing replay again and again. Occassionally, when I’m in the mood for less culinary bells and whistles and in search for the mundane ‘ungabunga’, I set aside my selfish wants to march for what is right, to stand proud for the people who stand-up to turn-on and be turned-on. Quality is worth the fight. Stand up for the love of brilliant food! ‘Good Taste’ comes at a cost.

June 20, 2005

I Say Tomato…

Filed under: Food, Shopping — Administrator @ 11:36 am Edit This

The Slow Food Movement and the days of yesteryear leave me wondering where I can get the perfect tomato. Could it be in my small, local market where the producers reflect generations of commitment to the land and devotion to the processes that yield the greatest achievements in taste? No, the baseball-glove skins of those little guys can’t be ignored with any amount of salt sprinkled on, but luckily
Austin has Central Markets and Whole Foods to fill the food-shopping void.

Tasteless, soul-less, and loveless tomatoes live meaningless lives all over, but not in my kitchen. Everyday, a tomato is raised in-kind to meet my personal standards of yumdom. It’s like a

University of
Tomato process that most tomatoes only dream about attending. The xenophobic and rubber-skinned tomatoes of
Central Texas needn’t bully the tasty foreign fellas into extinction. There is a tomato to suit every palette with the perfect tomato experience.

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~ by GoodTasteReport on May 30, 2006.

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